Our Story

What is Bet Alef ?

Bet Alef Meditative Synagogue is an inclusive spiritual community practicing an evolving Judaism as a path to awakening. We foster a Jewish spirituality for all ages that supports each individual, is realized in community, and manifests itself in our world as peaceful acts of greater compassion and love.

Bet Alef encourages each of us to discover new relevance in Jewish text, ritual and social action through integration of mind, body and spirit.

We practice Jewish meditation as a way to explore the mystical path of Judaism.

The Story Behind Bet Alef

Alef and Bet are the first two letters of the Hebrew alphabet. The alef is the silent letter that symbolizes the silence of Spirit from which all sound flows. The name of the letter bet means “house”.

Our synagogue is named Bet Alef because we are creating a bet alef – a home for the Jewish spirit. Through a meditative approach to Jewish tradition, text, ritual, and identity, we support a spiritual deepening that can express through acts of greater compassion in the world.

Each of us is bet alef, a home for the spirit. At Bet Alef, we seek to link our spirituality with our daily living. Watch the video below an example of our meditative approach to Jewish Spirituality.

 

Our Spiritual Leader

Rabbi Olivier BenHaimRabbi Olivier BenHaim brings a unique transformative perspective to Judaism, anchored in Jewish meditation, daily spiritual practices and the power of Jewish rituals. His approach supports the integration of mind, body and spirit – in self, in community and in relation to our planet. Rabbi Olivier shares this focus in services, classes and workshops for all ages, including regular opportunities for families to share the joyous nature of Shabbat and Jewish life.

Our Founding Rabbi

Rabbi Ted Falcon founded Bet Alef in 1993 to encourage a deeper celebration of Judaism as an authentic spiritual path. He retired from Bet Alef in 2009. Today, he shares the treasures of the Jewish Way in interfaith contexts with Sheikh Jamal Rahman and Pastor Don Mackenzie, the other Interfaith Amigos, with whom he has written Getting to the Heart of Interfaith.” and Religion Gone Astray: What We Found at the Heart of Interfaith.

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